2016 POP Conference
Oct 24-26, 2016 Tempe, AZ

Center for Problem-Oriented Policing

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26th Annual Problem-Oriented Policing Conference

October 24-26, 2016 – Mission Palms Hotel, Tempe, Arizona

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Agenda

Monday, Oct. 24 | Tuesday, Oct. 25 | Wednesday, Oct. 26

Monday, October 24th

7:30 - 8:30

Registration and Continental Breakfast
7:30 - 8:30 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016

8:30 - 9:45

OPENING SESSION
Room: Palm Ballroom
8:30 - 9:45 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Michael Scott, Center for Problem-Oriented Policing; Chief Sylvia Moir, Tempe Police Department
Keynote Presentation: Building Community Trust and Legitimacy through Problem-Oriented Policing: Lessons from the Cincinnati Collaborative Agreement
Room: Palm Ballroom
8:30 - 9:45 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
John Eck, Professor, University of Cincinnati; Iris Roley, Community Organizer, Cincinnati; Captain Lisa Davis, Cincinnati Police Department; Dorothy Smoot, Executive Director, Community Police Partnering Center, Cincinnati

This session describes the experiences of Cincinnati, Ohio, in improving the effectiveness of policing and the community perception of police fairness in the wake of large-scale public protests against policing practices and in the context of subsequent federal court-ordered police reforms. It presents these experiences from the police, community and academic perspectives.

9:45 - 10:15

Break
9:45 - 10:15 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016

10:15 - 11:30

Goldstein Award Finalist Zombie Houses: The Portland Approach to Vacant Homes
Room: Abbey
10:15 - 11:30 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Sergeant Randy Teig, Portland Police Bureau; Officer Joseph Young, Portland Police Bureau; Officer Ryan Mele, Portland Police Bureau

This session describes the City of Portland, Oregon’s, response to the problems associated with abandoned properties. The problem became more prevalent during the Great Recession. These homes, often in a state of limbo in terms of ownership, proved difficult to manage using conventional police tactics. In analyzing the problem it became apparent that a more-comprehensive strategy would be needed to address this complex issue. Working with a broad range of partners, Portland’s Police Bureau, Bureau of Environmental Services and Office of Neighborhood Involvement developed and implemented a coordinated strategy to mitigate the issues associated with these properties. A subsequent analysis indicated that this strategy was highly effective in addressing the problem.

Introduction to Situational Crime Prevention
Room: Palm F
10:15 - 11:30 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Rob Guerette

This session explains the basic principles and methods of situational crime prevention, a set of crime control theories that connect well with the problem-oriented policing approach. Situational crime prevention aims to reduce opportunities for crime by focusing on highly specific forms of crime, changing the way the immediate environment or target of the crime is managed or designed so that the risk or the effort required to commit the offense is increased, the rewards are reduced, or the triggers removed from the environment.

Measuring Organizational Change for Problem-Solving
Room: San Pedro
10:15 - 11:30 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Rachel Boba Santos, Professor, Radford University; Roberto Santos, Assistant Professor, Radford University

This session describes a method for measuring organizational change when implementing pro-active problem solving in a police department. Specific data-collection methods and survey questions measuring problem-solving activities, communication and transparency, accountability, leadership and mentoring, and rewards will be presented. Its application in several police agencies will illustrate the practicality and value of the method.

Sacramento (CA) Police Department - Neighborhood Revitalization in Old Sacramento
Room: Xavier
10:15 - 11:30 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Lieutenant Charles Husted, Sacramento Police Department; Sergeant Lewis Pease, Sacramento Police Department; Officer Kristen Beal, Sacramento Police Department; Beau Parkhurst, Deputy City Attorney, City of Sacramento

The Old Sacramento Neighborhood was plagued with crime, narcotics, gangs, gunfire, violence, dilapidated properties, illegal dumping, public nuisances, absentee landlords, minimal property investment, and a culture of fear. The neighborhood had been neglected for decades and had a region-wide reputation as a drug market. Problem analysis led to the goal of eliminating drivers of crime, restoring property-owner accountability, and changing the climate of fear through an integrated approach that included nuisance abatement, law enforcement, and a variety of city/state social services and educational programs to empower community members to take ownership in the neighborhood. The initiative resulted in crime reductions, reductions in community apathy and fear, non-criminally involved people occupying rental housing and participating in community activities, and property owners rehabilitating and improving property management.

Sacramento (CA) Police Department - Neighborhood Revitalization in Old Sacramento
Room: Xavier
10:15 - 11:30 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Lieutenant Charles Husted, Sacramento Police Department; Sergeant Lewis Pease, Sacramento Police Department; Officer Kristen Beal, Sacramento Police Department; Beau Parkhurst, Deputy City Attorney, City of Sacramento

The Old Sacramento Neighborhood was plagued with crime, narcotics, gangs, gunfire, violence, dilapidated properties, illegal dumping, public nuisances, absentee landlords, minimal property investment, and a culture of fear. The neighborhood had been neglected for decades and had a region-wide reputation as a drug market. Problem analysis led to the goal of eliminating drivers of crime, restoring property-owner accountability, and changing the climate of fear through an integrated approach that included nuisance abatement, law enforcement, and a variety of city/state social services and educational programs to empower community members to take ownership in the neighborhood. The initiative resulted in crime reductions, reductions in community apathy and fear, non-criminally involved people occupying rental housing and participating in community activities, and property owners rehabilitating and improving property management.

Communicating Problem-Oriented Policing Success
Room: Delores
10:15 - 11:30 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Matthew Pate, Senior Research Fellow, University at Albany-SUNY

If they don’t understand it, they won’t buy into it. Modern police agencies generate mountains of data that analysts and officers use to create reports, prepare budgets, plan crime-prevention strategies, and craft press releases. When done well, these products tell a clear and concise story of the agency, its priorities and values. When done poorly, policy makers and the public are less inclined to support the police or provide them necessary resources. Attendees will learn techniques to more effectively share complex information with the public and local government. Using real examples from the presenter’s own agency, topics will include: focusing the story; finding the right words; creating clean, clear charts and maps; and avoiding “death” by tables and PowerPoint.

Eau Claire (WI) Police Department - Country Inn and Suites Hotel Nuisance Property Project
Room: Joshua Tree
10:15 - 11:30 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Sergeant Brian Schneider, Eau Claire Police Department

The Midway Motor Lodge was a luxury hotel in its day and a destination spot for tourists. Its decline began around 2000, when periods of inactivity and ownership changes led it falling into disrepair. In 2007, new owners tore down the restaurant and sold that portion of the property to a convenience store chain. By mid-2009, the hotel was squarely on police radar as a “budget hotel” that was a hotbed for crime and disorder, including drug trafficking, prostitution, thefts and peace disturbances. The property had become a public nuisance. Partnering with other stakeholders, Eau Claire police first sought to abate the nuisance in a cooperative manner. Ultimately, the property was foreclosed upon by the bank and put up for sale. Unsold, the vacant hotel continued to be a problem, so the city condemned the hotel, and the bank razed the building and sold the lot to a local developer. The city council rezoned the property, and an apartment building now enhances the neighborhood with modern architecture and hundreds of new, good-natured residents.

11:30 - 1:00

Networking Luncheon
Room: Palm Ballroom
11:30 - 1:00 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016

back to top of Monday

1:00 - 2:15

Goldstein Award Finalist Arlington (TX) Police Department - Walmart Restorative Justice Initiative
Room: Abbey
1:00 - 2:15 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Assistant Chief Kevin Kolbye, Arlington Police Department; Sergeant Jakisha Jones, Arlington Police Department

The Walmart Restorative Justice Initiative is a collaborative partnership between the Arlington, Texas, Police Department and Walmart Corporation. The goal is to reduce criminal offenses and the overall police hours expended responding to calls for service and arrests. Assistant Chief Kevin Kolbye’s contact with Walmart executives resulted in the development of an 8-step approach, designed to shift the loss-prevention focus from apprehension to prevention. In an 11-month period, this approach resulted in a 42% reduction in calls for police service, a 71% reduction in theft and shoplifting arrests, and the savings of 5,000 hours of police time.

Introduction to Problem-Oriented Policing
Room: Palm F
1:00 - 2:15 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Michael Scott, Director, Center for Problem-Oriented Policing

Are you new or relatively new to problem solving and problem-oriented policing (POP)? This is the workshop for you. Hear what you need to know about the basic principles and methods of problem solving and POP. This workshop will also give you the information you need to help you decide which other workshops you should attend at this conference.

Working to Build Community Trust and Legitimacy through POP: Lessons from the Cincinnati Collaborative Agreement - Q & A Session
Room: San Pedro
1:00 - 2:15 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
John Eck, Professor, University of Cincinnati; Iris Roley, Community Organizer, Cincinnati; Captain Lisa Davis, Cincinnati Police Department; Dorothy Smoot, Executive Director, Community Police Partnering Center, Cincinnati

This session describes the experiences of Cincinnati, Ohio, in improving the effectiveness of policing and the community perception of police fairness in the wake of large-scale public protests against policing practices and in the context of subsequent federal court-ordered police reforms. It presents these experiences from the police, community and academic perspectives.

New Approaches to Intervening with Frequent Police Clients in the United Kingdom
Room: Xavier
1:00 - 2:15 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Stuart Kirby, Professor, University of Central Lancashire (UK)

A recent long-term UK project has highlighted that while many types of recorded crime have fallen, police workload is becoming more complex as demands to manage threat, harm, risk, and vulnerability are increasing. The logic of reducing long-term harm and demand through ‘up-stream’ intervention has become ever more compelling. The UK has seen a number of police forces embracing the concept of early action; specifically tackling high intensity callers and recipients of police, and wider, public services. This involves attending to individuals who are experiencing a wide variety of issues that stretch from mental health and alcohol-related problems to dementia and loneliness. This presentation focuses on the theory, challenges and operational developments relating to this new area of problem-oriented policing.

Edmonton Police Service (Alberta, Canada) - Neighborhood Empowerment Team: A Collaborative Problem-Solving Approach to Police/Social Work Problems
Room: Delores
1:00 - 2:15 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Sergeant Graham Blackburn, Edmonton Police Service; Andrew Pahl, Manager of Outcomes and Evaluation, Family Centre of Northern Alberta; Kris Andreychuk, Supervisor of Community Safety, City of Edmonton

The Edmonton, Alberta, Police Service, City of Edmonton and The Family Centre will be sharing experiences from their 20-year collaborative relationship as the Neighbourhood Empowerment Team (NET). Neighbourhood Empowerment Teams are currently assigned to all six Edmonton divisions. A team can be made up of one or more City of Edmonton Capacity Builders, Edmonton Police Service Constables and/or Youth Liaisons from The Family Centre. Teams offer a mix of social, policing and youth services to address “Situations” taking innovative, problem-solving approaches. Teams work in neighbourhoods for as long as required to help the community to reduce crime. NET has evolved significantly, often in surprising and unconventional ways, but the original vision of being innovative problem solvers continues to shape NET’s mission.

Goldstein Award Finalist Portland Police Bureau Zombie Houses: The Portland Approach to Vacant Homes
Room: Joshua Tree
1:00 - 2:15 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Sergeant Randy Teig, Portland Police Bureau; Officer Joseph Young, Portland Police Bureau; Officer Ryan Mele, Portland Police Bureau

This session describes the City of Portland, Oregon’s, response to the problems associated with abandoned properties. The problem became more prevalent during the Great Recession. These homes, often in a state of limbo in terms of ownership, proved difficult to manage using conventional police tactics. In analyzing the problem it became apparent that a more-comprehensive strategy would be needed to address this complex issue. Working with a broad range of partners, Portland’s Police Bureau, Bureau of Environmental Services and Office of Neighborhood Involvement developed and implemented a coordinated strategy to mitigate the issues associated with these properties. A subsequent analysis indicated that this strategy was highly effective in addressing the problem.

2:15 - 2:45

Break
2:15 - 2:45 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016

2:45 - 4:00

Goldstein Award Finalist Austin (TX) Police Department - Restore Rundberg: Leveraging Community Engagement to Reduce Crime and Fear of Crime
Room: Abbey
2:45 - 4:00 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Commander Donald Baker, Austin Police Department; Lieutenant Kevin Leverenz (ret.), Austin Police Department; Officer Ray Kianes, Austin Police Department; Officer Taber White, Austin Police Department

CPTED Old and New: Cutting Crime with Urban Design
Room: Palm F
2:45 - 4:00 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Greg Saville, Urban Planner, AlterNation LLC

Police/Prosecutor Problem-Solving
Room: San Pedro
2:45 - 4:00 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Julie Wartell, Crime Analysis Consultant; Christopher Ladwig, Community Prosecutor, Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office; Ben Wesson, Assistant District Attorney, Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office

This presentation stresses the value of police-prosecutor problem-solving partnerships, providing examples from San Diego and Milwaukee. The San Diego District Attorney's Office has focused on the analysis of regional data and partnering with police to better inform effective responses. Milwaukee County is a leader in implementing the Community Prosecution model in an urban environment, working on sustained person-based, place-based, collective-efficacy interventions. Coordination among prosecutors, police and community partners is key to successful crime reduction and sustained neighborhood development. This presentation will highlight why it is essential to have a dedicated community prosecutor working with police and communities, and the importance of analysis, and will provide specific examples and practice tips.

Houston (TX) Police Department and Phoenix (AZ) Police Department - POP in Specialized Investigative Units: Policing the Shadow Economy in Phoenix and Policing Vice in Houston
Room: Xavier
2:45 - 4:00 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Commander Tim Hampton, Phoenix Police Department; Sergeant Mike Hill, Houston Police Department

Homelessness and Nuisance Behavior in Indio California
Room: Delores
2:45 - 4:00 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Cody Telep, Assistant Professor, Arizona State University; Chief Richard Twiss (ret.), Indio Police Department; Sergeant Jeff Merritt, Indio Police Department; Officer Jose Ibarra, Indio Police Department

Homelessness is a chronic problem in Indio, California. The homeless population is disproportionately likely to become involved in the criminal justice system and to be involved in disorder-related calls for service. The Indio Police Department is implementing a two-pronged approach to homelessness and disorder-related calls and offenses. First, it is focusing the activity of two full-time officers to address the problem in a few target areas. Second, these officers also identify eligible clients for a multi-agency chronic homelessness program. The police have partnered with social-service providers, the Riverside County District Attorney’s Office and Public Defender’s Offices, local courts, probation, mental health, and several other non-profit organizations to formulate a Community Outreach Resource Program (CORP). Eligible individuals are linked to relevant community-based programs and get help resolving pending criminal cases through individualized recovery plans. Those who complete the program have minor charges and fines and fees dismissed. This session will describe the program and present a preliminary evaluation of the impact of CORP on clients and on the overall problem.

Goldstein Award Finalist Arlington (TX) Police Department - Walmart Restorative Justice Initiative
Room: Joshua Tree
2:45 - 4:00 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016
Chief Kevin Kolbye, Arlington Police Department; Sergeant Jakisha Jones, Arlington Police Department

The Walmart Restorative Justice Initiative is a collaborative partnership between the Arlington, Texas, Police Department and Walmart Corporation. The goal is to reduce criminal offenses and the overall police hours expended responding to calls for service and arrests. Assistant Chief Kevin Kolbye’s contact with Walmart executives resulted in the development of an 8-step approach, designed to shift the loss-prevention focus from apprehension to prevention. In an 11-month period, this approach resulted in a 42% reduction in calls for police service, a 71% reduction in theft and shoplifting arrests, and the savings of 5,000 hours of police time.

4:30 - 6:00

Networking Reception
4:30 - 6:00 : Monday, Oct. 24, 2016

back to top of Monday

Tuesday, October 25th

7:30 - 8:30

Continental Breakfast
7:30 - 8:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016

8:30 - 9:45

Goldstein Award Finalist New Zealand Police - A Prevention First Response to Men Perpetrating Family Violence in North Canterbury, New Zealand
Room: Abbey
8:30 - 9:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Senior Constable Chris Hurring, New Zealand Police; Inspector Corrie Parnell, New Zealand Police; Nicole Woodward, CEO, Aviva; Darryn Russell, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori, Canterbury University

New Approaches to Intervening with Frequent Police Clients in the United Kingdom
Room: Palm D
8:30 - 9:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Stuart Kirby, Professor, University of Central Lancashire (UK)

A recent long-term UK project has highlighted that while many types of recorded crime have fallen, police workload is becoming more complex as demands to manage threat, harm, risk, and vulnerability are increasing. The logic of reducing long-term harm and demand through ‘up-stream’ intervention has become ever more compelling. The UK has seen a number of police forces embracing the concept of early action; specifically tackling high intensity callers and recipients of police, and wider, public services. This involves attending to individuals who are experiencing a wide variety of issues that stretch from mental health and alcohol-related problems to dementia and loneliness. This presentation focuses on the theory, challenges and operational developments relating to this new area of problem-oriented policing.

Money Ball of Crime Analysis: Creating Better Performance Measures for Problem Analysis and Crime Suppression
Room: San Pedro
8:30 - 9:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Noah Fritz, Strategic Planning, Analysis and Research Center Supervisor, Tempe Police Department

Historically, policing has predominantly been measured by three performance indicators: (1) reported crime rates, (2) case-clearance rates, and (3) police-response times. The National Incident-Based Reporting System, while a more robust attempt at understanding crime, is not yet fully implemented. The National Crime Victimization Survey and the American Community Survey supplement the picture with a national view of crime and victimization, but few of these are useful measures at the local level for crime enforcement/prevention, problem solving, or organizational performance. The Tempe Police Department (TPD), through a US DOJ grant, has embraced a synthesized analysis approach that focuses on People, Patterns, Places, and Problems (the 4Ps). Using an approach similar to that in current use in baseball, this session will report the TPD’s progress to date, and solicit input from participants regarding improved crime-analysis metrics and what work remains to be done in building a more robust set of police performance and community measures. A new Crime Analysis Toolkit produced by the Bureau of Justice Assistance will also be previewed.

Houston (TX) Police Department - Collaborations and Innovative Approaches for Reducing Street Homelessness
Room: Xavier
8:30 - 9:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Sergeant Steve Wick, Houston Police Department

Homelessness is an umbrella term that includes many different living situations and encompasses everything from street habitation to permanent supportive housing. Approximately one-fifth of Houston, Texas’s homeless population is living with serious mental illness and that population is more likely to have negative encounters with the police. A majority of the calls for service to Houston police for civility-type issues are generated by the chronically homeless. In 2003, the Houston Police Department began outreach to the homeless to connect them with service providers. Subsequent problem analysis led to an understanding that the lack of a picture identification and difficulty in being able to access a fragmented service-provider system were major concerns for homeless individuals. The Homeless Outreach Team (HOT), staffed by police officers and mental-health case workers, was launched in 2011 to address the problem. It developed a process for providing homeless individuals identification which helps them access services and get off the streets. HOT has changed the relationship among police, the street population, homeless service providers, and local government.

Homelessness and Nuisance Behavior in Indio California
Room: Delores
8:30 - 9:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Cody Telep, Assistant Professor, Arizona State University; Chief Richard Twiss (ret.), Indio Police Department; Sergeant Jeff Merritt, Indio Police Department; Officer Jose Ibarra, Indio Police Department

Homelessness is a chronic problem in Indio, California. The homeless population is disproportionately likely to become involved in the criminal justice system and to be involved in disorder-related calls for service. The Indio Police Department is implementing a two-pronged approach to homelessness and disorder-related calls and offenses. First, it is focusing the activity of two full-time officers to address the problem in a few target areas. Second, these officers also identify eligible clients for a multi-agency chronic homelessness program. The police have partnered with social-service providers, the Riverside County District Attorney’s Office and Public Defender’s Offices, local courts, probation, mental health, and several other non-profit organizations to formulate a Community Outreach Resource Program (CORP). Eligible individuals are linked to relevant community-based programs and get help resolving pending criminal cases through individualized recovery plans. Those who complete the program have minor charges and fines and fees dismissed. This session will describe the program and present a preliminary evaluation of the impact of CORP on clients and on the overall problem.

Goldstein Award Finalist Austin (TX) Police Department - Restore Rundberg: Leveraging Community, Engagement to Reduce Crime and Fear of Crime
Room: Joshua Tree
8:30 - 9:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Commander Donald Baker, Austin Police Department; Lieutenant Kevin Leverenz (ret.), Austin Police Department; Officer Ray Kianes, Austin Police Department; Officer Taber White, Austin Police Department

9:45 - 10:15

Break
9:45 - 10:15 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016

10:15 - 11:30

Goldstein Award Finalist London Metropolitan Police, Borough of Newham (UK) - Operation Alabama: Response to Rise of Rough Sleeping and Related Crime and ASB within the London Borough of Newham
Room: Abbey
10:15 - 11:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Inspector Phillip Stinger, London Metropolitan Police; Sergeant Andrew Montague, London Metropolitan Police

Communicating Problem-Oriented Policing Success
Room: Palm D
10:15 - 11:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Matthew Pate, Senior Research Fellow, University of Albany - SUNY

If they don’t understand it, they won’t buy into it. Modern police agencies generate mountains of data that analysts and officers use to create reports, prepare budgets, plan crime-prevention strategies, and craft press releases. When done well, these products tell a clear and concise story of the agency, its priorities and values. When done poorly, policy makers and the public are less inclined to support the police or provide them necessary resources. Attendees will learn techniques to more effectively share complex information with the public and local government. Using real examples from the presenter’s own agency, topics will include: focusing the story; finding the right words; creating clean, clear charts and maps; and avoiding “death” by tables and PowerPoint.

Police/Prosecutor Problem-Solving
Room: San Pedro
10:15 - 11:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Julie Wartell, Crime Analysis Consultant; Christopher Ladwig, Community Prosecutor, Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office; Ben Wesson, Assistant District Attorney, Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office

This presentation stresses the value of police-prosecutor problem-solving partnerships, providing examples from San Diego and Milwaukee. The San Diego District Attorney's Office has focused on the analysis of regional data and partnering with police to better inform effective responses. Milwaukee County is a leader in implementing the Community Prosecution model in an urban environment, working on sustained person-based, place-based, collective-efficacy interventions. Coordination among prosecutors, police and community partners is key to successful crime reduction and sustained neighborhood development. This presentation will highlight why it is essential to have a dedicated community prosecutor working with police and communities, and the importance of analysis, and will provide specific examples and practice tips.

Gang Injunctions: Tracking and Disrupting Inter-Gang Conflict in Los Angeles
Room: Xavier
10:15 - 11:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Gisela Bichler, Professor, California State University San Bernardino

Gang injunctions aim to restrict gang members’ social interactions so as to reduce inter-gang conflicts and community terrorization. Building on what we know about how violence spreads through social networks, this session looks at the effectiveness of gang injunctions, in particular how they worked controlling violence between Bloods and Crips in the greater Los Angeles area over the past 20 years, how inter-gang violence adapts to injunctions, and how we could modify injunctions to strengthen their effects.

Cuyahoga (OH) Metropolitan Housing Authority Police Department - Police Assisted Referral of Public-Housing Residents
Room: Delores
10:15 - 11:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Sergeant Jackelyn Burgos, Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority Police Department

Residents of the Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority (CMHA) in Cleveland, Ohio, are regularly exposed to violence in their neighborhoods which has created an environment in which youth and adults become hypervigilant, distrustful of others—especially police—and emotionally and behaviorally compromised. Responding to violence is also draining for police officers. Yet, officers are ill-equipped to assist violence victims and witnesses, having little to no training to address social crises, and carrying only tools for arrest or deterrence. The Police Assisted Referral Program represents a shift in the police response to violence exposure and other problems experienced by citizens through recognizing officers first as social responders, providing them with training for this role, and equipping them with referral cards and resulting services for citizens. As of 2015, over 10,000 individuals have been referred to services through PAR. Program evaluation has shown a positive response from residents to PAR and to the social services provided.

Goldstein Award Finalist New Zealand Police - A Prevention First Response to Men Perpetrating Family Violence in North Canterbury, New Zealand
Room: Joshua Tree
10:15 - 11:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Senior Constable Chris Hurring, New Zealand Police; Inspector Corrie Parnell, New Zealand Police; Nicole Woodward, CEO, Aviva; Darryn Russell, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori, Canterbury University

11:30 - 1:00

Lunch on your own
11:30 - 1:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016

back to top of Tuesday

1:00 - 2:15

Goldstein Award Finalist High Point (NC) Police Department - Intimate Partner Violence Intervention Project
Room: Abbey
1:00 - 2:15 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Chief Kenneth Shultz, High Point Police Department; Captain Timothy Ellenberger, High Point Police Department; David Kennedy, Professor, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

The High Point Police Department in partnership with High Point Community Against Violence, Guilford County District Attorney’s Office, Family Service of the Piedmont, and University of North Carolina-Greensboro researchers have implemented a strategy to combat domestic violence known as, Offender Focused Domestic Violence Initiative (OFDVI). OFDVI has resulted in re-offense rates of 16% across 2,000+ offenders over the course of 4-plus years. The recidivism rates for DV offenders after OFDVI implementation are staggering given the rates for DV offenders in the literature, which range from 20-34% for one to two-year periods. Additionally, Intimate Partner homicides in High Point have dropped from 17 in the five years prior to implementation, to 2 in the six years since implementation.

Introduction to Problem-Oriented Policing
Room: Palm D
1:00 - 2:15 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Michael Scott, Director, Center for Problem-Oriented Policing

Are you new or relatively new to problem solving and problem-oriented policing (POP)? This is the workshop for you. Hear what you need to know about the basic principles and methods of problem solving and POP. This workshop will also give you the information you need to help you decide which other workshops you should attend at this conference.

New Training for Problem-Solvers: PTO and PBL Programs
Room: San Pedro
1:00 - 2:15 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Greg Saville, Urban Planner, AlterNation LLC

Edmonton Police Service (Alberta, Canada) Neighborhood Empowerment Team: A Collaborative Problem-Solving Approach to Police/Social Work Problems
Room: Xavier
1:00 - 2:15 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Sergeant Graham Blackburn, Edmonton Police Service; Andrew Pahl, Manager of Outcomes and Evaluation, Family Centre of Northern Alberta; Kris Andreychuk, Supervisor of Community Safety, City of Edmonton

The Edmonton, Alberta, Police Service, City of Edmonton and The Family Centre will be sharing experiences from their 20-year collaborative relationship as the Neighbourhood Empowerment Team (NET). Neighbourhood Empowerment Teams are currently assigned to all six Edmonton divisions. A team can be made up of one or more City of Edmonton Capacity Builders, Edmonton Police Service Constables and/or Youth Liaisons from The Family Centre. Teams offer a mix of social, policing and youth services to address “Situations” taking innovative, problem-solving approaches. Teams work in neighbourhoods for as long as required to help the community to reduce crime. NET has evolved significantly, often in surprising and unconventional ways, but the original vision of being innovative problem solvers continues to shape NET’s mission.

Policing Terrorism: Principles and Examples
Room: Delores
1:00 - 2:15 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Ronald Clarke, Professor, Rutgers University

Police have vital roles in responding to terrorist attacks and in preventing them. As for prevention, they are in the best position to learn about the emergence of local terrorist threats and they can work to identify and protect the most vulnerable targets in their jurisdictions. Case studies of protecting targets will be discussed.

Goldstein Award Finalist London Metropolitan Police, Borough of Newham - Operation Alabama: Response to Rise of Rough Sleeping and Related Crime and ASB within the London Borough of Newham
Room: Joshua Tree
1:00 - 2:15 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Inspector Phillip Stinger, London Metropolitan Police; Sergeant Andrew Montague, London Metropolitan Police

2:15 - 2:45

Break
2:15 - 2:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016

2:45 - 4:00

Goldstein Award Finalist Glendale (AZ) Police Department - Employing POP To Target Convenience Store Crime: The Glendale Arizona Smart Policing Initiative
Room: Abbey
2:45 - 4:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Commander Colby Brandt, Glendale Police Department; Mike White, Professor, Arizona State University; Chief Frank Balkcom, Page Police Department

Critical analysis of problem-oriented policing suggests some of the steps in the SARA model come with a higher degree of difficulty than others, particularly analysis and assessment. The Glendale Smart Policing Initiative sought to overcome these difficulties through a partnership with academic researchers, and the Glendale team identified crime at Circle K convenience stores as the target problem. The team conducted a comprehensive, robust implementation of the SARA model to address the Circle K problem, and analysis shows that significant crime reductions persisted at four of the six target stores for more than two years after the intervention, including a diffusion of benefits to the surrounding neighborhoods of those stores. We conclude that the rigorous implementation of POP, anchored by the researcher/practitioner partnership, explains the significant, sustained reductions in crime and disorder at the targeted Circle K convenience stores in Glendale.

Sacramento (CA) Police Department - Neighborhood Revitalization in Old Sacramento
Room: Palm D
2:45 - 4:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Lieutenant Charles Husted, Sacramento Police Department; Sergeant Lewis Pease, Sacramento Police Department; Officer Kristen Beal, Sacramento Police Department; Beau Parkhurst, Deputy City Attorney, City of Sacramento

The Old Sacramento Neighborhood was plagued with crime, narcotics, gangs, gunfire, violence, dilapidated properties, illegal dumping, public nuisances, absentee landlords, minimal property investment, and a culture of fear. The neighborhood had been neglected for decades and had a region-wide reputation as a drug market. Problem analysis led to the goal of eliminating drivers of crime, restoring property-owner accountability, and changing the climate of fear through an integrated approach that included nuisance abatement, law enforcement, and a variety of city/state social services and educational programs to empower community members to take ownership in the neighborhood. The initiative resulted in crime reductions, reductions in community apathy and fear, non-criminally involved people occupying rental housing and participating in community activities, and property owners rehabilitating and improving property management.

Measuring Organizational Change for Problem-Solving
Room: San Pedro
2:45 - 4:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Rachel Boba Santos, Professor, Radford University; Lt. Roberto Santos (ret.), Assistant Professor, Radford University

This session describes a method for measuring organizational change when implementing pro-active problem solving in a police department. Specific data-collection methods and survey questions measuring problem-solving activities, communication and transparency, accountability, leadership and mentoring, and rewards will be presented. Its application in several police agencies will illustrate the practicality and value of the method.

Eau Claire (WI) Police Department - Country Inn and Suites Hotel Nuisance Property Projec
Room: Xavier
2:45 - 4:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Sergeant Brian Schneider, Eau Claire Police Department

The Midway Motor Lodge was a luxury hotel in its day and a destination spot for tourists. Its decline began around 2000, when periods of inactivity and ownership changes led it falling into disrepair. In 2007, new owners tore down the restaurant and sold that portion of the property to a convenience store chain. By mid-2009, the hotel was squarely on police radar as a “budget hotel” that was a hotbed for crime and disorder, including drug trafficking, prostitution, thefts and peace disturbances. The property had become a public nuisance. Partnering with other stakeholders, Eau Claire police first sought to abate the nuisance in a cooperative manner. Ultimately, the property was foreclosed upon by the bank and put up for sale. Unsold, the vacant hotel continued to be a problem, so the city condemned the hotel, and the bank razed the building and sold the lot to a local developer. The city council rezoned the property, and an apartment building now enhances the neighborhood with modern architecture and hundreds of new, good-natured residents.

Houston (TX) Police Department and Phoenix (AZ) Police Department - POP in Specialized Investigative Units: Policing the Shadow Economy in Phoenix and Policing Vice in Houston
Room: Delores
2:45 - 4:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Commander Tim Hampton, Phoenix Police Department; Sergeant Mike Hill, Houston Police Department

Goldstein Award Finalist High Point (NC) Police Department - Intimate Partner Violence Intervention Project
Room: Joshua Tree
2:45 - 4:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016
Chief Kenneth Shultz, High Point Police Department; Captain Timothy Ellenberger, High Point Police Department; David Kennedy, Professor, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

The High Point Police Department in partnership with High Point Community Against Violence, Guilford County District Attorney’s Office, Family Service of the Piedmont, and University of North Carolina-Greensboro researchers have implemented a strategy to combat domestic violence known as, Offender Focused Domestic Violence Initative (OFDVI). OFDVI has resulted in re-offense rates of 16% across 2,000+ offenders over the course of 4-plus years. The recidivism rates for DV offenders after OFDVI implementation are staggering given the rates for DV offenders in the literature, which range from 20-34% for one to two-year periods. Additionally, Intimate Partner homicides in High Point have dropped from 17 in the five years prior to implementation, to 2 in the six years since implementation.

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Wednesday, October 26th

7:30 - 8:30

Continental Breakfast
7:30 - 8:30 : Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016

8:30 - 9:45

Money Ball of Crime Analysis: Creating Better Performance Measures for Problem Analysis & Crime Suppression
Room: San Pedro
8:30 - 9:45 : Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016
Noah Fritz, Strategic Planning, Analysis and Research Center (SPARC) Supervisor, Tempe Police Department

Historically, policing has predominantly been measured by three performance indicators: 1: reported crime rates, 2: case-clearance rates, and 3: police-response times. The National Incident-Based Reporting System, while a more robust attempt at understanding crime, is not yet fully implemented. The National Crime Victimization Survey and the American Community Survey supplement the picture with a national view of crime and victimization, but few of these are useful measures at the local level for crime enforcement/prevention, problem solving, or organizational performance. The Tempe Police Department, through a US DOJ grant, has embraced a synthesized analysis approach that focuses on People, Patterns, Places, and Problems --the 4Ps. Using an approach similar to that in current use in baseball, this session will report the TPD’s progress to date, and solicit input from participants regarding improved crime-analysis metrics and what work remains to be done in building a more robust set of police performance and community measures. A new Crime Analysis Toolkit produced by the Bureau of Justice Assistance will also be previewed.

Policing Terrorism: Principles and Examples
Room: Xavier
8:30 - 9:45 : Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016
Ronald Clarke, Professor, Rutgers University

Police have vital roles in responding to terrorist attacks and in preventing them. As for prevention, they are in the best position to learn about the emergence of local terrorist threats and they can work to identify and protect the most vulnerable targets in their jurisdictions. Case studies of protecting targets will be discussed.

CPTED Old and New: Cutting Crime with Urban Design
Room: Delores
8:30 - 9:45 : Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016
Greg Saville, Urban Planner, AlterNation LLC

Goldstein Award Finalist Glendale (AZ) Police Department - Employing POP to Target Convenience Store Crime: The Glendale Arizona Smart Policing Initiative
Room: Joshua Tree
8:30 - 9:45 : Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016
Commander Colby Brandt, Glendale Police Department; Mike White, Professor, Arizona State University; Chief Frank Balkcom, Page Police Department

Critical analysis of problem-oriented policing suggests some of the steps in the SARA model come with a higher degree of difficulty than others, particularly analysis and assessment. The Glendale Smart Policing Initiative sought to overcome these difficulties through a partnership with academic researchers, and the Glendale team identified crime at Circle K convenience stores as the target problem. The team conducted a comprehensive, robust implementation of the SARA model to address the Circle K problem, and analysis shows that significant crime reductions persisted at four of the six target stores for more than two years after the intervention, including a diffusion of benefits to the surrounding neighborhoods of those stores. We conclude that the rigorous implementation of POP, anchored by the researcher/practitioner partnership, explains the significant, sustained reductions in crime and disorder at the targeted Circle K convenience stores in Glendale.

9:45 - 10:00

Break
9:45 - 10:00 : Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016

10:00 - 10:30

Presentation of the 2016 Herman Goldstein Award for Excellence in Problem-Oriented Policing
Room: Abbey
10:00 - 10:30 : Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016

And the winner is... How did the audience and the judges vote? Learn which project earns the title of winner of the 2016 Herman Goldstein Award for Excellence in Problem-Oriented Policing.

10:30 - 10:45

Break
10:30 - 10:45 : Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016

10:45 - 12:00

Gang Injunctions: Tracking and Disrupting Inter-Gang Conflict in Los Angeles
Room: San Pedro
10:45 - 12:00 : Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016
Gisela Bichler, Professor, California State University San Bernardino

Gang injunctions aim to restrict gang members’ social interactions so as to reduce inter-gang conflicts and community terrorization. Building on what we know about how violence spreads through social networks, this session looks at the effectiveness of gang injunctions, in particular how they worked controlling violence between Bloods and Crips in the greater Los Angeles area over the past 20 years, how inter-gang violence adapts to injunctions, and how we could modify injunctions to strengthen their effects.

Introduction to Situational Crime Prevention
Room: Xavier
10:45 - 12:00 : Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016
Rob Guerette, Associate Professor, Florida International Universit

This session explains the basic principles and methods of situational crime prevention, a set of crime control theories that connect well with the problem-oriented policing approach. Situational crime prevention aims to reduce opportunities for crime by focusing on highly specific forms of crime, changing the way the immediate environment or target of the crime is managed or designed so that the risk or the effort required to commit the offense is increased, the rewards are reduced, or the triggers removed from the environment.

Cuyahoga (OH) Metropolitan Housing Authority Police Department - Police Assisted Referral of Public-Housing Residents
Room: Delores
10:45 - 12:00 : Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016
Sergeant Jackelyn Burgos, Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority Police Department

Houston (TX) Police Department - Collaborations and Innovative Approaches for Reducing Street Homelessness
Room: Joshua Tree
10:45 - 12:00 : Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016
Sergeant Steve Wick, Houston Police Department

Homelessness is an umbrella term that includes many different living situations and encompasses everything from street habitation to permanent supportive housing. Approximately one-fifth of Houston, Texas’s homeless population is living with serious mental illness and that population is more likely to have negative encounters with the police. A majority of the calls for service to Houston police for civility-type issues are generated by the chronically homeless. In 2003, the Houston Police Department began outreach to the homeless to connect them with service providers. Subsequent problem analysis led to an understanding that the lack of a picture identification and difficulty in being able to access a fragmented service-provider system were major concerns for homeless individuals. The Homeless Outreach Team (HOT), staffed by police officers and mental-health case workers, was launched in 2011 to address the problem. It developed a process for providing homeless individuals identification which helps them access services and get off the streets. HOT has changed the relationship among police, the street population, homeless service providers, and local government.

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