Center for Problem-Oriented Policing

22nd Annual Problem-Oriented Policing Conference

October 22-24, 2012 Westin Providence Hotel, Providence, RI

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Agenda

Monday, Oct. 22 | Tuesday, Oct. 23 | Wednesday, Oct. 24

Monday, October 22th

speaker bios PDF

9:00 - 10:00

Opening Session
Room: Narragansett Ballroom
9:00 - 10:00 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Malcolm Sparrow, Professor, Harvard University

10:30 - 11:45

Goldstein Award Finalist Anaheim (CA) Police Department Beach Boulevard Prostitution: Addressing Human Trafficking in Anaheim
Room: Providence I and IV
10:30 - 11:45 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Lieutenant Steve Marcin, Anaheim Police Department, Sergeant Jim Cossin, Anaheim Police Department, Sergeant Craig Friesen, Anaheim Police Department, Lita Mercado, Program Director, CSP, Inc.

In 2011, the Anaheim Police Department recognized an increase of prostitution activity along Beach Boulevard. The Beach Blvd Prostitution problem solving project was initiated. Analysis of females contacted revealed most had similar backgrounds and circumstances that lead them into prostitution. This discovery lead investigators to a shift in perspective and produced an innovative problem solving approach to "the oldest profession."

Introduction to Problem-Oriented Policing
Room: Providence II and III
10:30 - 11:45 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Presenter: Michael Scott

Are you new or relatively new to problem solving and problem-oriented policing (POP)? This is the workshop for you. Hear what you need to know about the basic principles and methods of problem solving and POP. This workshop will also give you the information you need to help you decide which other workshops you should attend at this conference.

Madison (WI) Police Department Special Investigations Unit: Focused Deterrence
Room: Newport/Washington
10:30 - 11:45 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Chief Noble Wray, Madison Police Department , Lieutenant Thomas Woodmansee, Madison Police Department , Detective Samantha Kellogg, Madison Police Department

The Madison Police Department's Special Investigations Unit (SIU) utilizes a coordinated and sustainable intelligence-driven model that identifies the most violent repeat offenders and high profile criminals in the community and disrupts their offending through focused deterrence. SIU then provide these offenders with focused attention designed to change their criminal behavior. This attention not only involves heightened law enforcement efforts but also a coordinated approach involving community resource support agencies. The offenders will be provided with an opportunity to receive assistance in quality of life areas such as: employment assistance, drug and alcohol assistance, housing, education, obtaining a driver's license, parenting skills, mental health assistance, etc. The success of a focused deterrence model is dependent upon partnerships with the community. The responsibility for holding offenders accountable for their actions rests not solely upon law enforcement but with the entire community. The message to the offenders is that the violence must stop and it is their responsibility. Law Enforcement, Corrections, Prosecutors and the Community will send the same message- "We want to help you change your violent behavior. We will offer you help to change but if you choose to continue your violent acts and victimize our community, we will use all available resources to ensure that you receive swift and stringent consequences." The focused deterrence model in law enforcement is growing throughout the country. Several communities have experienced significant reductions in violent crimes, drug offenses, gang and juvenile crime, along with remarkable social cost reductions as a result of deterring crime. A successful focused deterrence approach will actually result in a reduction in crime while making fewer arrests.

Integrating of Crime Analysis for Problem-Solving into Patrol Work
Room: Bristol/Kent
10:30 - 11:45 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Dr. Rachel Boba Santos, Associate Professor, Florida Atlantic University , Roberto Santos, Detective Lieutenant, Port St. Lucie, Police Department

This presentation is for police officers, first-line supervisors, as well as for managers and commanders seeking guidance for using crime analysis for problem solving in patrol operations. A recent national survey on crime analysis and problem solving indicates that different ranks within patrol require different types of crime analysis that match their roles in the problem solving process. The presentation will discuss the different types of crime analysis products and their specific uses in problem solving. It will focus on the key characteristics and standardized content for crime analysis products generally and then illustrate specific examples of products from innovative police agencies from around the country.

Recurring Difficulties with POP
Room: Waterplace I
10:30 - 11:45 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
John Eck, Professor, University of Cincinnati , Nick Tilley, Director, UCL Security Science Research Training Center (UK)

A third of a century since Herman Goldstein first called for a problem-oriented approach to policing, great progress has been made in solving recurring police problems. However, despite the decades of effort, police agencies run into many of the difficulties that police executives confronted in the early years. In this session, we will look at these recurring difficulties, discuss why they occur, and what might be done to address them. We will ask, in particular, whether the systematic development, refinement and assessment of checklists might be one way to improve implementation.

Houston (TX) Police Department Back from the Brink: Reducing Crime and Disorder in the Antoine Corridor
Room: Waterplace II and III
10:30 - 11:45 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Sergeant Michael Hill, Houston Police Department , Officer Ryan Watson, Houston Police Department , Officer Chris Schuster, Houston Police Department , Facilitator: Jon Shane, Assistant Professor, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

In the City of Houston with 656 square miles and 2.1 million citizens, the Antoine Corridor stood out as the most notorious and most dangerous square mile in Houston for well over a decade. This study looks at the development of a fledgling problem-oriented policing unit within the Houston Police Department and the implementation of those strategies in the face of entrenched traditional policing methods within a large department. It addresses some of the ways that HPD developed relationships and strategies to not only reduce crime in that area, but to begin the rebuilding of a neighborhood that brought it back from the brink.

11:45 - 1:15

Lunch Break
11:45 - 1:15 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012

back to top of Monday

1:15 - 2:30

Goldstein Award Finalist Boston (MA) Police Department Safe Street Teams Violence Reduction Initiative
Room: Providence I and IV
1:15 - 2:30 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Anthony Braga, Professor, Rutgers University , Deputy Superintendent Nora Baston, Boston Police Department , Lead Judge: Gary Cordner, Professor, Kutztown University

In April 2011, Dr. Anthony A. Braga completed a 2007-2010 statistical analysis of the Safe Street Team (SST) program. With regard to Safe Street Team strategies employed, findings had shown positive results, including a 15% decrease in violent crime and a 19% decrease in robberies. Findings also shown that both decrease occurred without displacement to nearby areas. In addition, during this 2007-2010 time period the Smart Policing Teams documented 396 problem-oriented actions taken in the 3 categories of: situational/environmental interventions, enforcement interventions, and community outreach/social service interventions. With further research the Boston Police Department hopes to determine which of these three categories of actions were most helpful in achieving these decreases in crime. Some strategies employed by the Safe Street Teams included: graffiti removal, trash removed from street / park, focused enforcement on drug selling crews / drug market areas, ongoing order maintenance to manage social disorder (public drinking, loitering, etc.), planned and held a community events (e.g., block party, youth dialogue), and establishment of new recreational opportunities for area youth (e.g., basketball league).

Introduction to Situational Crime Prevention
Room: Providence II and III
1:15 - 2:30 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Ronald Clarke, Professor, Rutgers University

This session explains the basic principles and methods of situational crime prevention, a set of crime control theories that connect well with the problem-oriented policing approach. Situational crime prevention aims to reduce opportunities for crime by focusing on highly specific forms of crime, changing the way the immediate environment or target of the crime is managed or designed so that the risk or the effort required to commit the offense is increased, the rewards are reduced, or the triggers removed from the environment.

Boise (ID) Police Department Organized Retail Crime Interdiction: A Partnership that Works
Room: Newport/Washington
1:15 - 2:30 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Curtis Crum, Supervisor, Crime Prevention Unit, Boise Police Dept. , Deputy Chief William Bones, Boise Police Department , Facilitator: Kathleen Gallagher, University of Cincinnati

The Urban Institute, with funding from COPS Office, has recently concluded a national-level exploration of the police practice of stopping and searching pedestrians. Police are increasingly engaging in pedestrian stops and searches in high-crime communities, and some have touted the value of doing so in reducing crime and yielding weapons and narcotics confiscations. However, the unintended negative consequences of pedestrian stops and searches can be extreme and far reaching, particularly when conducted in the absence of a strong partnership and communication strategy with community stakeholders. The use of pedestrian stops in a manner that minimizes negative consequences therefore requires a strict adherence to the principles of community policing. This panel describes the community policing philosophy in the context of pedestrian stops and provides recommendations for how police executives can send the right message and develop effective policies - both internally and in the community – to promote the responsible, lawful, and respectful application of police stop and search powers. This session also describes the role that line officers can play in minimizing the negative impact of pedestrian stops on police-community relations, along with strategies that enhance the accountability of line officers in adhering to departmental policies and procedures when conducting stops.

Intensive Stop and Frisk
Room: Bristol/Kent
1:15 - 2:30 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Nancy LaVigne, Director, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute (DC)

The Urban Institute, with funding from COPS Office, has recently concluded a national-level exploration of the police practice of stopping and searching pedestrians. Police are increasingly engaging in pedestrian stops and searches in high-crime communities, and some have touted the value of doing so in reducing crime and yielding weapons and narcotics confiscations. However, the unintended negative consequences of pedestrian stops and searches can be extreme and far reaching, particularly when conducted in the absence of a strong partnership and communication strategy with community stakeholders. The use of pedestrian stops in a manner that minimizes negative consequences therefore requires a strict adherence to the principles of community policing. This panel describes the community policing philosophy in the context of pedestrian stops and provides recommendations for how police executives can send the right message and develop effective policies - both internally and in the community – to promote the responsible, lawful, and respectful application of police stop and search powers. This session also describes the role that line officers can play in minimizing the negative impact of pedestrian stops on police-community relations, along with strategies that enhance the accountability of line officers in adhering to departmental policies and procedures when conducting stops.

Washington State Patrol Basin Triangle Project: Decreasing Fatal Crash and Serious Injury Accidents
Room: Waterplace I
1:15 - 2:30 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Trooper Ryan Raymond, Washington State Patrol , Trooper Timothy Kron, Washington State Patrol , Facilitator: Julie Wartell, Center for Problem-Oriented Policing

Between 2006 and 2010, there was a significant increase in the number of serious injury and fatality collisions in the Columbia River Basin "Triangle." A high number of collisions occurred between Moses Lake, Ephrata, and Soap Lake areas involving teenage drivers. In 2010, the "Basin Triangle" POPS (Problem Oriented Public Safety) project was initiated in an attempt to stop the yearly increase in fatality collisions. We gathered collision data which showed several causes to include; impaired driving, speed, driver inattention, texting or talking on phones, and roadway structure to name a few. Throughout 2011, our goal was to reduce the increasing trend of injury and fatality collisions in the Basin by at least 4% by December 31st. Our Action Plan was to use three of the four E's (Enforcement, Engineering, and Education) listed in the Washington State Strategic Highway Safety Plan. Throughout 2011, several projects were set in place utilizing the three E's to accomplish our goal. Throughout the project, the SARA model (Scanning, Analysis, Response, Assessment) was used as a guide in working to make a difference. At the end of 2011, the assessment showed that there was a 64.7% decrease in fatal collisions and a 12.8% decrease in serious injury collisions compared to 2010. Compared to the 2006-2010 five year average, there was a 36.8% decrease in fatal collisions and a 7% decrease in serious injury collisions.

Goldstein Award Finalist Anaheim (CA) Police Department Beach Boulevard Prostitution: Addressing Human Trafficking in Anaheim
Room: Waterplace II and III
1:15 - 2:30 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Lieutenant Steve Marcin, Anaheim Police Department , Sergeant Jim Cossin, Anaheim Police Department , Sergeant Craig Friesen, Anaheim Police Department , Lita Mercado, Program Director, CSP Inc.

In 2011, the Anaheim Police Department recognized an increase of prostitution activity along Beach Boulevard. The Beach Blvd Prostitution problem solving project was initiated. Analysis of females contacted revealed most had similar backgrounds and circumstances that lead them into prostitution. This discovery lead investigators to a shift in perspective and produced an innovative problem solving approach to "the oldest profession."

2:30 - 3:00

Break
2:30 - 3:00 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012

3:00 - 4:15

Goldstein Award Finalist UGreater Manchester Police (UK) Repeat Victimization: Road to Reduction, Disrupting the Optimal Forager
Room: Providence I and IV
3:00 - 4:15 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Chief Superintendent Mark Roberts, Greater Manchester Police, Inspector Vincent Jones, Greater Manchester Police, Matthew Fielding, Intelligence Analyst, Greater Manchester Police, Lead Judge: Stuart Kirby, Lecturer in Criminology, Lancaster University

The presentation provides a review of a two year process within Trafford (UK) which sought to address the problem of domestic burglary. The approach developed has been adapted from scientific research by Johnson and Bowers (2004) and looks at disrupting the offending pattern of an offender termed the 'optimal forager'. This talk will also focus on a further development named 'super-cocooning', attempting to target potential victims. Delegates will be provided with a simple cost effective approach based on scientific research which has achieved large reductions that they can replicate within their policing areas. The key thread throughout this presentation is concentrated on the importance of reducing repeat victimization.

Policing Problems Associated with Abandoned Buildings
Room: Providence II and III
3:00 - 4:15 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Jon Shane, Assistant Professor, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Abandoned buildings and lots are a subcategory of the larger problem of physical disorder in a community and may act as precursors for larger issues when they attract vandals, are used as “stash houses” for narcotics, guns, stolen property, prostitution and other crimes. They may also accumulate trash and attract squatters or homeless persons seeking shelter, particularly in cold weather regions. Deterioration may lead to a structurally unsound building, which presents a serious community hazard. Although a problem, abandoned properties do present opportunities for cities to reuse the property to its advantage by restoring economic viability, building affordable housing and allocating open space for community gardens, plazas, parks, and recreation.

Avon and Somerset Constabulary (UK) Senior Citizen Liaison Team: Distraction Burglary Victimization
Room: Newport/Washington
3:00 - 4:15 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Sergeant Ashley Jones, Avon and Somerset Constabulary, Facilitator: Julie Wartell, Center for Problem-Oriented Policing

The Senior Citizen Liaison Team (SCLT) was formed in December 2009 with volunteer officers of the neighborhood Policing Team based at Bishopsworth Police Station, the project being focused at providing a tailored crime prevention and social inclusion service to the older adult population of Bristol. The ethos of the SCLT has remained constant, 'If you have contact with the Senior Citizen Liaison Team, you are far, less likely to become a victim of doorstep crime'. The team has evolved in its 3-years of existence, from a small police project, into a nationally registered charity, which offers crime prevention presentations to thousands of older adults each quarter, as well as reaching many more through its free, award-winning, quarterly newsletter 'The Senior Siren'. Victims benefit from the Platinum Service Scheme, which offers a unique aftercare service which is second to none. As the population increases in average age, policing the older adult community will become an increasingly more specialized and important role. The SCLT shows how this can be achieved in conjunction with local policing services.

Hot Spots in Lowell (MA)
Room: Bristol/Kent
3:00 - 4:15 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Brenda Bond, Assistant Professor, Suffolk University, Deputy Superintendent Ryan Arthur, Lowell Police Department

Research shows that problem solving is an effective mechanism for dealing with a variety of crime and disorder issues. In turn, police leaders are pressing their staff to utilize problem solving evidence to affect every day public safety challenges. Police leaders are also partnering with researchers in an effort to learn from their experiences, and institutionalize and sustain problem solving practices. This session will showcase a research partnership that sparked the transformation of the Lowell, Massachusetts Police Department into a problem solving organization. Using the lessons learned from a localized problem solving experiment, the Lowell Police Department has adopted a “Smart Policing” approach. This organizational approach, supported by BJA, integrates performance measurement and research partnerships, outreach and collaboration; managing organizational change; the use of intelligence for strategic targeting; and data and information systems. Presenters will discuss the strategies utilized and the organizational lessons learned as they evolve from a community policing organization to one that utilizes evidence from a variety of disciplines to tackle crime and disorder. They will also discuss the unavoidable organizational challenges of change.

Synthesis from Antithesis: Bringing Together the Principles of Evidence-Based Policing, Problem-Solving and Compstat into a Practical Framework
Room: Waterplace I
3:00 - 4:15 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Steve Burton, Director of Community Safety, Enforcement and Policing, Transport for London

Transport for London has worked with its transport policing partners, the Metropolitan Police and the British Transport Police, to develop a performance management framework for delivering crime reduction. This framework encompasses the key features of successful problem solving and evidence led policing within a CompStat like overlay. This framework has developed over the last six years from a very 'New York' style CompStat to one that takes into account the key features of problem solving, community policing and partnership and now incorporates some of the latest thinking around evidence led policing. The presentation will outline the development of the process and how it is now implemented from both a strategic and tactical perspective, highlighting lessons learned and the practical implications of embarking and delivering on such a process. This approach has played a key role in a reduction of over 40% in transport crime in London since 2005/6 and helped TfL win two Goldstein Awards in that period. The presentation will be given by Steve Burton, Director of Community Safety and Policing and Ola Saar, Senior Performance Analyst at Transport for London who played a key role delivery of this performance model.

Goldstein Award Finalist Boston (MA) Police Department Safe Street Teams Violence Reduction Initiative
Room: Waterplace II and III
3:00 - 4:15 : Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Anthony Braga, Professor, Rutgers University, Deputy Superintendent Nora Baston, Boston Police Department

In April 2011, Dr. Anthony A. Braga completed a 2007-2010 statistical analysis of the Safe Street Team (SST) program. With regard to Safe Street Team strategies employed, findings had shown positive results, including a 15% decrease in violent crime and a 19% decrease in robberies. Findings also shown that both decrease occurred without displacement to nearby areas. In addition, during this 2007-2010 time period the Smart Policing Teams documented 396 problem-oriented actions taken in the 3 categories of: situational/environmental interventions, enforcement interventions, and community outreach/social service interventions. With further research the Boston Police Department hopes to determine which of these three categories of actions were most helpful in achieving these decreases in crime. Some strategies employed by the Safe Street Teams included: graffiti removal, trash removed from street / park, focused enforcement on drug selling crews / drug market areas, ongoing order maintenance to manage social disorder (public drinking, loitering, etc.), planned and held a community events (e.g., block party, youth dialogue), and establishment of new recreational opportunities for area youth (e.g., basketball league).

back to top of Monday

Tuesday, October 23th

speaker bios PDF

7:30 - 8:30

Herman Goldstein Informal Discussion with Early Risers
Room: Bristol/Kent
7:30 - 8:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012

At past POP Conferences, Herman Goldstein has made himself available to early risers to exchange thoughts about problem-oriented policing. Herman has agreed to do so again. This is an opportunity for informal discussions. Feel free to come and talk, ask Herman questions or engage others who attend with your ideas, concerns, or challenges with problem-oriented policing.

8:30 - 9:00

Continental Breakfast
8:30 - 9:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012

9:00 - 10:15

Goldstein Award FinalistLas Vegas (NV) Police Department School Violence Initiative
Room: Providence I and IV
9:00 - 10:15 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Patrick Baldwin, Manager, Crime Analysis Group, Las Vegas Police Dept., Captain John McGrath, Las Vegas Police Department, Lead Judge: Johannes Knutsson, Professor, Norwegian Police University

The Southern Nevada Counter-Terrorism Center (SNCTC) coordinates a school violence initiative comprised of four partner agencies: Clark County School District Police Department (CCSDPD), Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD), Henderson Police Department (HPD), and North Las Vegas Police Department (NLVPD). The initiative's goal is to reduce violence in Clark County schools. In 2008 Clark County schools were seeing an increase in violent incidents in and around schools. In February 2008, a student was shot and killed leaving local high school. This shooting shocked the community and created a media frenzy. School violence and school safety stories were broadcast on local media outlets for weeks. Shortly thereafter, Sheriff Doug Gillespie met with Clark County School District officials to discuss a plan to reduce school violence. One solution was for the school district to provide a liaison to the Southern Nevada Counter-Terrorism Center (SNCTC). On March 3, 2008, a representative of CCSDPD was assigned to the SNCTC. This liaison position coordinates information and intelligence between the partner agencies and it is distributed by the Watch Station at SNCTC. The Watch Station serves as the communication hub of the SNCTC. A protocol was developed to respond to and to mitigate potential violent incidents. Since the partner agencies and the SNCTC began their coordinated efforts, violence has decreased at Clark County schools by 44% and there has not been another incident like the February 2008 shooting.

Synthesis from Antithesis: Bringing Together the Principles of Evidence-Based Policing, Problem-Solving and Compstat into a Practical Framework
Room: Providence II and III
9:00 - 10:15 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Steve Burton, Director of Community Safety, Enforcement and Policing, Transport for London

Transport for London has worked with its transport policing partners, the Metropolitan Police and the British Transport Police, to develop a performance management framework for delivering crime reduction. This framework encompasses the key features of successful problem solving and evidence led policing within a CompStat like overlay. This framework has developed over the last six years from a very 'New York' style CompStat to one that takes into account the key features of problem solving, community policing and partnership and now incorporates some of the latest thinking around evidence led policing. The presentation will outline the development of the process and how it is now implemented from both a strategic and tactical perspective, highlighting lessons learned and the practical implications of embarking and delivering on such a process. This approach has played a key role in a reduction of over 40% in transport crime in London since 2005/6 and helped TfL win two Goldstein Awards in that period. The presentation will be given by Steve Burton, Director of Community Safety and Policing and Ola Saar, Senior Performance Analyst at Transport for London who played a key role delivery of this performance model.

Lancashire Constabulary (UK) The Custody Experience: Lowering First Time Juvenile Offending
Room: Newport/Washington
9:00 - 10:15 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Constable David Johnson, Lancashire Constabulary, Constable Gary Salisbury, Lancashire Constabulary, Sue Roach, Community Safety Manager, Lancashire Community Gateway Association, Facilitator: Chief Steve Pitts, Reno Police Department

In 2009 National media was focusing attention on the rise in youth crime and juvenile delinquency; locally in Preston a city in the North of England there was widespread local public concern; this was coupled with the threat of Government cuts in resources within the Police and other services. Combining the partnership of a social housing provider, Police youth intervention officer and a Custody office sergeant a scanning exercise took place and opportunities were explored. Utilising an existing facility; the custody office, a crime and consequence program was developed which targeted the individual young person, at the earliest possible stage. It was a simple approach and as the program used existing resources costs were low, in three years there has been a 37% reduction of these young people going on to be arrested.

Intensive Stop and Frisk
Room: Bristol/Kent
9:00 - 10:15 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Nancy LaVigne, Director, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute (DC)

The Urban Institute, with funding from COPS Office, has recently concluded a national-level exploration of the police practice of stopping and searching pedestrians. Police are increasingly engaging in pedestrian stops and searches in high-crime communities, and some have touted the value of doing so in reducing crime and yielding weapons and narcotics confiscations. However, the unintended negative consequences of pedestrian stops and searches can be extreme and far reaching, particularly when conducted in the absence of a strong partnership and communication strategy with community stakeholders. The use of pedestrian stops in a manner that minimizes negative consequences therefore requires a strict adherence to the principles of community policing. This panel describes the community policing philosophy in the context of pedestrian stops and provides recommendations for how police executives can send the right message and develop effective policies - both internally and in the community – to promote the responsible, lawful, and respectful application of police stop and search powers. This session also describes the role that line officers can play in minimizing the negative impact of pedestrian stops on police-community relations, along with strategies that enhance the accountability of line officers in adhering to departmental policies and procedures when conducting stops.

Boise (ID) Police Department Organized Retail Crime Interdiction: A Partnership that Works
Room: Waterplace I
9:00 - 10:15 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Deputy Chief William Bones, Boise Police Department , Curtis Crum, Supervisor, Crime Prevention Unit, Boise Police Department, Facilitator: Kathleen Gallagher, University of Cincinnati

The Boise Police Department's Organized Retail Crime Interdiction Team is a unique, innovative and proactive partnership between law enforcement and retail businesses to address an increasing problem with Organized Retail Crime. Using the SARA model, our Interdiction Team has leveraged police resources using retail loss prevention intelligence to increase arrests of dangerous repeat offenders, resulting in an increase in public safety, a reduction in financial losses in the millions of dollars to retail businesses, and an improved partnership between the Boise Police Department and the local business community. Targeted crimes include: Major Product Theft, Refund Scams, Credit Card Fraud, and Quick Change Schemes perpetrated by local and national Organized Retail Crime (ORC) groups. This dynamic partnership relies on real-time communication with the retail community and in-progress apprehensions, making the Boise Police Department's Organized Retail Crime (ORC) Interdiction Team partnership a premier model in retail theft interdiction for other law enforcement jurisdictions, and a valuable contributor to the quality of life in our community, and surrounding region.

10:45 - 12:00

Goldstein Award FinalistNew South Wales Police (AUS) Strike Force Piccadilly: Police Initiatives to Investigate and Prevent ATM Physical Attacks
Room: Providence I and IV
10:45 - 12:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Detective Superintendent Greig Newbery, New South Wales Police, Detective Superintendent Murray Chapman, New South Wales Police, Lead Judge: Greg Saville, Urban Planner, AlterNation LLC

Strike Force Piccadilly I and II were two major New South Wales Police Force investigations conducted between 2005 and 2009 to address an upsurge in ram raids and gas attacks targeting automatic teller machines (ATMS). The strike forces initiated a public-private partnership that resulted in the arrest of numerous offenders and led to a dramatic reduction in these types of offences being committed.

Policing Problems Associated with Abandoned Buildings
Room: Providence II and III
10:45 - 12:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Jon Shane, Assistant Professor, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Abandoned buildings and lots are a subcategory of the larger problem of physical disorder in a community and may act as precursors for larger issues when they attract vandals, are used as “stash houses” for narcotics, guns, stolen property, prostitution and other crimes. They may also accumulate trash and attract squatters or homeless persons seeking shelter, particularly in cold weather regions. Deterioration may lead to a structurally unsound building, which presents a serious community hazard. Although a problem, abandoned properties do present opportunities for cities to reuse the property to its advantage by restoring economic viability, building affordable housing and allocating open space for community gardens, plazas, parks, and recreation.

Hamilton Police Service (Canada) A.C.T.I.O.N Strategy: Violent Crime Reduction Downtown
Room: Newport/Washington
10:45 - 12:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Inspector Scott Rastin, Hamilton Police Service, Staff Sergeant Marty Schulenberg, Hamilton Police Service , Facilitator: Kathleen Gallagher, University of Cincinnati

The City of Hamilton is located on the western end of Lake Ontario with a population of 525,697 people. A decline in the manufacturing sector had greatly affected the City of Hamilton's economy creating a deteriorating downtown subject to crime. To revive economic development and investment into the city, the perception of safety needed to be addressed. The Hamilton Police Service recognized the issues and developed the Addressing Crime Trends in our Neighborhoods (A.C.T.I.O.N.) Strategy. The strategy includes greater police presence by deploying foot, bike and mounted patrol. The strategy also incorporates a social navigator to address at-risk individuals and repeat offenders. In full, since the inception of the A.C.T.I.O.N. Strategy in 2010, Hamilton has seen crime reduction, economic development and a greater perception of safety in the downtown area.

Hot Spots in Lowell (MA)
Room: Bristol/Kent
10:45 - 12:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Brenda Bond, Assistant Professor, Suffolk University, Deputy Superintendent Ryan Arthur, Lowell Police Department

Research shows that problem solving is an effective mechanism for dealing with a variety of crime and disorder issues. In turn, police leaders are pressing their staff to utilize problem solving evidence to affect every day public safety challenges. Police leaders are also partnering with researchers in an effort to learn from their experiences, and institutionalize and sustain problem solving practices. This session will showcase a research partnership that sparked the transformation of the Lowell, Massachusetts Police Department into a problem solving organization. Using the lessons learned from a localized problem solving experiment, the Lowell Police Department has adopted a “Smart Policing” approach. This organizational approach, supported by BJA, integrates performance measurement and research partnerships, outreach and collaboration; managing organizational change; the use of intelligence for strategic targeting; and data and information systems. Presenters will discuss the strategies utilized and the organizational lessons learned as they evolve from a community policing organization to one that utilizes evidence from a variety of disciplines to tackle crime and disorder. They will also discuss the unavoidable organizational challenges of change.

Regulatory Approaches to Crime Places
Room: Waterplace I
10:45 - 12:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
John Eck, Professor, University of Cincinnati

Police problem-solving efforts and research, going back to the late 1980's has consistently pointed to a few high crime places as the keys to reducing crime. Typically, persistent troublesome places have been tackled one-by-one with either intensive patrolling or problem solving. Considerable experience with this has now accumulated, yet many of these places endure. Recent efforts in some cities have taken a broader approach to regulating troublesome places. In this session, we will systematically look at regulatory approaches to preventing crime at places, show why it is possible, describe forms of regulation that can be used, and examine the relationship between regulation and problem solving.

Goldstein Award FinalistLas Vegas (NV) Police Department School Violence Initiative
Room: Waterplace II and III
10:45 - 12:00 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Patrick Baldwin, Manager, Crime Analysis Group, Las Vegas Police Dept., Captain John McGrath, Las Vegas Police Department

The Southern Nevada Counter-Terrorism Center (SNCTC) coordinates a school violence initiative comprised of four partner agencies: Clark County School District Police Department (CCSDPD), Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD), Henderson Police Department (HPD), and North Las Vegas Police Department (NLVPD). The initiative's goal is to reduce violence in Clark County schools. In 2008 Clark County schools were seeing an increase in violent incidents in and around schools. In February 2008, a student was shot and killed leaving local high school. This shooting shocked the community and created a media frenzy. School violence and school safety stories were broadcast on local media outlets for weeks. Shortly thereafter, Sheriff Doug Gillespie met with Clark County School District officials to discuss a plan to reduce school violence. One solution was for the school district to provide a liaison to the Southern Nevada Counter-Terrorism Center (SNCTC). On March 3, 2008, a representative of CCSDPD was assigned to the SNCTC. This liaison position coordinates information and intelligence between the partner agencies and it is distributed by the Watch Station at SNCTC. The Watch Station serves as the communication hub of the SNCTC. A protocol was developed to respond to and to mitigate potential violent incidents. Since the partner agencies and the SNCTC began their coordinated efforts, violence has decreased at Clark County schools by 44% and there has not been another incident like the February 2008 shooting.

1:30 - 2:45

Goldstein Award FinalistProvidence Police Department Accountability, Mentoring and Enforcement: Problem Solving in Public Housing.
Room: Providence I and IV
1:30 - 2:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Lieutenant Dean Isabella, Providence Police Department, James Baum, Special Assistant Attorney General, RI Attorney General's Office, Sorrel Devine, Director, Department of Resident Services, Providence Housing Authority, Lead Judge: Deborah Weisel, Professor, North Carolina State University

The Providence Police Department (PPD) undertook problem-solving in collaboration with the Providence Housing Authority (PHA) and other partners to address violent crime and gang activity in two public housing developments. Disproportionately frequent shootings and violent crime in and around Manton and Hartford can be attributed to cross-gang aggression, with juveniles being the primary perpetrators. PPD, PHA and a variety of non-profit partners collaborated to implement a response strategy that encompassed enforcement, intervention and prevention. Juvenile arrests for the post intervention period 2006-2001 dropped by 52% in Hartford Park and 81% in Manton Heights

Recurring Difficulties with POP
Room: Providence II and III
1:30 - 2:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
John Eck, Professor, University of Cincinnati, Nick Tilley, Director, UCL Security Science Research Training Center (UK)

A third of a century since Herman Goldstein first called for a problem-oriented approach to policing, great progress has been made in solving recurring police problems. However, despite the decades of effort, police agencies run into many of the difficulties that police executives confronted in the early years. In this session, we will look at these recurring difficulties, discuss why they occur, and what might be done to address them. We will ask, in particular, whether the systematic development, refinement and assessment of checklists might be one way to improve implementation.

Houston (TX) Police Department Back from the Brink: Reducing Crime and Disorder in the Antoine Corridor
Room: Newport/Washington
1:30 - 2:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Sergeant Michael Hill, Houston Police Department, Officer Ryan Watson, Houston Police Department, Officer Chris Schuster, Houston Police Department

In the City of Houston with 656 square miles and 2.1 million citizens, the Antoine Corridor stood out as the most notorious and most dangerous square mile in Houston for well over a decade. This study looks at the development of a fledgling problem-oriented policing unit within the Houston Police Department and the implementation of those strategies in the face of entrenched traditional policing methods within a large department. It addresses some of the ways that HPD developed relationships and strategies to not only reduce crime in that area, but to begin the rebuilding of a neighborhood that brought it back from the brink.

Colorado Springs (CO) Police Department Off-Limits Bars for Military
Room: Bristol/Kent
1:30 - 2:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Josh Levin, Criminal Intelligence Analyst, Colorado Springs Police Dept., Molly Miles, Supervisor, Analytical Services, Colorado Springs P.D. , Nick Jernigan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Colorado Springs has a vibrant entertainment district in the Downtown Core. Over the past several years, Calls for Service to this area have increased and officers often encounter large groups of intoxicated people particularly at bar closing time. These issues were also evident at popular bars in other portions of the City. Colorado Springs also has a very large military population with nearly 26,000 service men and women assigned to various installations in the region including the U.S. Air Force Academy. With the combination of a high concentration of popular liquor establishments and a large number of military personnel, many of whom have recently returned from deployments to the Middle East, the result can be quite problematic for the police department. In collaboration with military and local business, the Colorado Springs Police Department created a model to assess risks and identify problematic liquor establishments. This led to the closing of several problematic establishments and was the catalyst needed for others to cooperate with the CSPD and its partners.

Metropolitan Police Service (UK) Operation Pearl: Addressing Inebriants and Beggars in a Town Center
Room: Waterplace I
1:30 - 2:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Sergeant Darren Hepple, London Metropolitan Police, Kim Merry, Hope for Havering Charity, Facilitator: Assistant Chief (ret.)Ron Glensor, Reno Police Department

Police in the London Borough of Havering, through coordination with partner agencies identified “rough sleepers,” street drinkers and beggars were contributing to Anti Social Behavior within the Town Center. These individuals squabbled among themselves for the most lucrative begging locations and urinated and defecated in sight of the public. In response to the problem, the London Metropolitan Police launched Operation PEARL, a multi-agency partnership with British Transport Police, CCTV and Street Pastors. The initiative put pressure on rough sleepers to change their behavior or risk enforcement actions. The scheme assigned a dedicated liaison officer to each rough sleeper to act as a support worker guiding them towards recognized pathways of recovery. The scheme has brought together a number of organizations and has established a referral process for any new rough sleeper identified. It has brought about the introduction of a night shelter assessment hub, supported housing scheme and coordinated partnership working. The successes of this effort included the referral of 61 rough sleepers to various agencies and organizations for assistance.

Goldstein Award FinalistNew South Wales Police (AUS) Strike Force Piccadilly: Police Initiatives to Investigate and Prevent ATM Physical Attack
Room: Waterplace II and III
1:30 - 2:45 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Detective Superintendent Greig Newbery, New South Wales Police, Detective Superintendent Murray Chapman, New South Wales Police

Strike Force Piccadilly I and II were two major New South Wales Police Force investigations conducted between 2005 and 2009 to address an upsurge in ram raids and gas attacks targeting automatic teller machines (ATMS). The strike forces initiated a public-private partnership that resulted in the arrest of numerous offenders and led to a dramatic reduction in these types of offences being committed.

3:15 - 4:30

Hamilton Police Service (Canada) A.C.T.I.O.N Strategy: Violent Crime Reduction Downtown
Room: Providence I and IV
3:15 - 4:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Inspector Scott Rastin, Hamilton Police Service, Staff Sergeant Marty Schulenberg, Hamilton Police Service , Facilitator: Kathleen Gallagher, University of Cincinnati

The City of Hamilton is located on the western end of Lake Ontario with a population of 525,697 people. A decline in the manufacturing sector had greatly affected the City of Hamilton's economy creating a deteriorating downtown subject to crime. To revive economic development and investment into the city, the perception of safety needed to be addressed. The Hamilton Police Service recognized the issues and developed the Addressing Crime Trends in our Neighborhoods (A.C.T.I.O.N.) Strategy. The strategy includes greater police presence by deploying foot, bike and mounted patrol. T he strategy also incorporates a social navigator to address at-risk individuals and repeat offenders. In full, since the inception of the A.C.T.I.O.N. Strategy in 2010, Hamilton has seen crime reduction, economic development and a greater perception of safety in the downtown area.

Crime Analysis Barriers to Effective POP in Police Agencies
Room: Providence II and III
3:15 - 4:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Susan Smith, Crime Analyst, Shawnee Police Department

This session will focus on the role of the crime analyst in POP activities. Issues of getting the analyst involved early in the process, obtaining and verifying a variety of both police and non-police data sets, the collation, organization and storage of that data, the analysis of the data and the dissemination of the findings(what, when, where and how) are critical to successful POP projects. Additionally, assuring police operations, specifically those involved in the project, have a full understanding of the analysts' role is key as well. Bruce and Smith will systematically identify and address each of these areas, as well as several related areas, to assist analysts and those performing analytical work in a POP agency or on a POP product to provide a solid baseline which results in greater success of the project.

Madison (WI) Police Department Special Investigations Unit: Focused Deterrence
Room: Newport/Washington
3:15 - 4:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Chief Noble Wray, Madison Police Department, Lieutenant Thomas Woodmansee, Madison Police Department, Detective Samantha Kellogg, Madison Police Department

The Madison Police Department's Special Investigations Unit (SIU) utilizes a coordinated and sustainable intelligence-driven model that identifies the most violent repeat offenders and high profile criminals in the community and disrupts their offending through focused deterrence. SIU then provide these offenders with focused attention designed to change their criminal behavior. This attention not only involves heightened law enforcement efforts but also a coordinated approach involving community resource support agencies. The offenders will be provided with an opportunity to receive assistance in quality of life areas such as: employment assistance, drug and alcohol assistance, housing, education, obtaining a driver's license, parenting skills, mental health assistance, etc. The success of a focused deterrence model is dependent upon partnerships with the community. The responsibility for holding offenders accountable for their actions rests not solely upon law enforcement but with the entire community. The message to the offenders is that the violence must stop and it is their responsibility. Law Enforcement, Corrections, Prosecutors and the Community will send the same message- “We want to help you change your violent behavior. We will offer you help to change but if you choose to continue your violent acts and victimize our community, we will use all available resources to ensure that you receive swift and stringent consequences.” The focused deterrence model in law enforcement is growing throughout the country. Several communities have experienced significant reductions in violent crimes, drug offenses, gang and juvenile crime, along with remarkable social cost reductions as a result of deterring crime. A successful focused deterrence approach will actually result in a reduction in crime while making fewer arrests.

Integrating of Crime Analysis for Problem-Solving into Patrol Work
Room: Bristol/Kent
3:15 - 4:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Dr. Rachel Boba Santos, Associate Professor, Florida Atlantic University, Roberto Santos, Detective Lieutenant, Port St. Lucie, Police Department

This presentation is for police officers, first-line supervisors, as well as for managers and commanders seeking guidance for using crime analysis for problem solving in patrol operations. A recent national survey on crime analysis and problem solving indicates that different ranks within patrol require different types of crime analysis that match their roles in the problem solving process. The presentation will discuss the different types of crime analysis products and their specific uses in problem solving. It will focus on the key characteristics and standardized content for crime analysis products generally and then illustrate specific examples of products from innovative police agencies from around the country.

Implementing POP
Room: Waterplace I
3:15 - 4:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Michael Scott, Director, Center for Problem-Oriented Policing, Stuart Kirby, Lecturer in Criminology, Lancaster University (UK)

This session explores the administrative, organizational, political, and leadership steps necessary to implementing problem-oriented policing throughout a police agency, to include: preparing and assessing the organization for change, integrating problem solving with other policing functions, communicating and “selling” organizational changes, structuring the organization, teaching requisite skills, promoting interagency and community collaboration, and developing accountability systems. The facilitators have extensive experience implementing POP in various sized police agencies in the United States and the United Kingdom. They are also co-authors of a manual on the subject which they will distribute at the session.

Goldstein Award FinalistProvidence Police Department Accountability, Mentoring and Enforcement: Problem Solving in Public Housing
Room: Waterplace II and III
3:15 - 4:30 : Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012
Lieutenant Dean Isabella, Providence Police Department, James Baum, Special Assistant Attorney General, RI Attorney General's Office, Sorrel Devine, Director, Department of Resident Services, Providence Housing Authority

The Providence Police Department (PPD) undertook problem-solving in collaboration with the Providence Housing Authority (PHA) and other partners to address violent crime and gang activity in two public housing developments. Disproportionately frequent shootings and violent crime in and around Manton and Hartford can be attributed to cross-gang aggression, with juveniles being the primary perpetrators. PPD, PHA and a variety of non-profit partners collaborated to implement a response strategy that encompassed enforcement, intervention and prevention. Juvenile arrests for the post intervention period 2006-2001 dropped by 52% in Hartford Park and 81% in Manton Heights.

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Wednesday, October 24th

speaker bios PDF

8:30 - 9:45

Avon and Somerset Constabulary (UK) Senior Citizen Liaison Team: Distraction Burglary Victimization
Room: Providence I and IV
8:30 - 9:45 : Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012
Sergeant Ashley Jones, Avon and Somerset Constabulary, Facilitator: Julie Wartell, Center for Problem-Oriented Policing

The Senior Citizen Liaison Team (SCLT) was formed in December 2009 with volunteer officers of the neighborhood Policing Team based at Bishopsworth Police Station, the project being focused at providing a tailored crime prevention and social inclusion service to the older adult population of Bristol. The ethos of the SCLT has remained constant, 'If you have contact with the Senior Citizen Liaison Team, you are far, less likely to become a victim of doorstep crime'. The team has evolved in its 3-years of existence, from a small police project, into a nationally registered charity, which offers crime prevention presentations to thousands of older adults each quarter, as well as reaching many more through its free, award-winning, quarterly newsletter 'The Senior Siren'. Victims benefit from the Platinum Service Scheme, which offers a unique aftercare service which is second to none. As the population increases in average age, policing the older adult community will become an increasingly more specialized and important role. The SCLT shows how this can be achieved in conjunction with local policing services.

Cutting Crime with Design and 2nd Generation CPTED
Room: Providence II and III
8:30 - 9:45 : Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012
Greg Saville, Urban Planner, AlterNation LLC

Why do so many successful POP projects employ Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) and Design Out Crime? Because it works! No POP practitioner should show up without a full problem response tool box. In this session you will learn how to cut crime opportunities with physical design. We will conduct an in-class demo of the CPTED principle called proxemics and show how turf control protects targets from offenders. We will also provide written material with case studies. You will see how modern CPTED - 2nd Generation CPTED - dives much deeper into the social roots of crime rather than simply hacking at the physical branches of it. You will also discover how to pair POP with a new urban planning method for longer term community development called SafeGrowth. Already underway in cities across the US and Canada, SafeGrowth eradicates the neighborhood conditions that cause crime in the first place. You will learn how you can play a key role bringing that that program to your community.

Lancashire Constabulary (UK) The Custody Experience: Lowering First Time Juvenile Offending
Room: Newport/Washington
8:30 - 9:45 : Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012
Constable David Johnson, Lancashire Constabulary, Constable Gary Salisbury, Lancashire Constabulary, Sue Roach, Community Safety Manager, Lancashire Community Gateway Association, Facilitator: Captain Andy Mills, San Diego Police Department

In 2009 National media was focusing attention on the rise in youth crime and juvenile delinquency; locally in Preston a city in the North of England there was widespread local public concern; this was coupled with the threat of Government cuts in resources within the Police and other services. Combining the partnership of a social housing provider, Police youth intervention officer and a Custody office sergeant a scanning exercise took place and opportunities were explored. Utilising an existing facility; the custody office, a crime and consequence program was developed which targeted the individual young person, at the earliest possible stage. It was a simple approach and as the program used existing resources costs were low, in three years there has been a 37% reduction of these young people going on to be arrested.

Regulatory Approaches to Crime Places
Room: Bristol/Kent
8:30 - 9:45 : Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012
John Eck, Professor, University of Cincinnati

Police problem-solving efforts and research, going back to the late 1980's has consistently pointed to a few high crime places as the keys to reducing crime. Typically, persistent troublesome places have been tackled one-by-one with either intensive patrolling or problem solving. Considerable experience with this has now accumulated, yet many of these places endure. Recent efforts in some cities have taken a broader approach to regulating troublesome places. In this session, we will systematically look at regulatory approaches to preventing crime at places, show why it is possible, describe forms of regulation that can be used, and examine the relationship between regulation and problem solving.

10:00 - 10:30

Presentation of the 2012 Herman Goldstein Award for Excellence in Problem-Oriented Policing
Room: Waterplace Ballroom
10:00 - 10:30 : Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012

And the winner is… How did the audience and the judges vote? Learn which project earns the title of winner of the 2012 Herman Goldstein Award for Excellence in Problem-Oriented Policing.

10:45 - 12:00

Crime Analysis Barriers to Effective POP in Police Agencies
Room: Providence I and IV
10:45 - 12:00 : Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012
Susan Smith, Crime Analyst, Shawnee Police Department

This session will focus on the role of the crime analyst in POP activities. Issues of getting the analyst involved early in the process, obtaining and verifying a variety of both police and non-police data sets, the collation, organization and storage of that data, the analysis of the data and the dissemination of the findings(what, when, where and how) are critical to successful POP projects. Additionally, assuring police operations, specifically those involved in the project, have a full understanding of the analysts' role is key as well. Bruce and Smith will systematically identify and address each of these areas, as well as several related areas, to assist analysts and those performing analytical work in a POP agency or on a POP product to provide a solid baseline which results in greater success of the project.

Colorado Springs Police Department Off-Limits Bars for Military
Room: Providence II and III
10:45 - 12:00 : Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012
Josh Levin, Criminal Intelligence Analyst, Colorado Springs Police Dept., Molly Miles, Supervisor, Analytical Services, Colorado Springs P.D.

Colorado Springs has a vibrant entertainment district in the Downtown Core. Over the past several years, Calls for Service to this area have increased and officers often encounter large groups of intoxicated people particularly at bar closing time. These issues were also evident at popular bars in other portions of the City. Colorado Springs also has a very large military population with nearly 26,000 service men and women assigned to various installations in the region including the U.S. Air Force Academy. With the combination of a high concentration of popular liquor establishments and a large number of military personnel, many of whom have recently returned from deployments to the Middle East, the result can be quite problematic for the police department. In collaboration with military and local business, the Colorado Springs Police Department created a model to assess risks and identify problematic liquor establishments. This led to the closing of several problematic establishments and was the catalyst needed for others to cooperate with the CSPD and its partners.

Washington State Patrol Basin Triangle Project: Decreasing Fatal Crash and Serious Injury Accidents
Room: Newport/Washington
10:45 - 12:00 : Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012
Trooper Ryan Raymond, Washington State Patrol, Trooper Timothy Kron, Washington State Patrol, Facilitator: Julie Wartell, Center for Problem-Oriented Policing

Between 2006 and 2010, there was a significant increase in the number of serious injury and fatality collisions in the Columbia River Basin “Triangle.” A high number of collisions occurred between Moses Lake, Ephrata, and Soap Lake areas involving teenage drivers. In 2010, the “Basin Triangle” POPS (Problem Oriented Public Safety) project was initiated in an attempt to stop the yearly increase in fatality collisions. We gathered collision data which showed several causes to include; impaired driving, speed, driver inattention, texting or talking on phones, and roadway structure to name a few. Throughout 2011, our goal was to reduce the increasing trend of injury and fatality collisions in the Basin by at least 4% by December 31st. Our Action Plan was to use three of the four E's (Enforcement, Engineering, and Education) listed in the Washington State Strategic Highway Safety Plan. Throughout 2011, several projects were set in place utilizing the three E's to accomplish our goal. Throughout the project, the SARA model (Scanning, Analysis, Response, Assessment) was used as a guide in working to make a difference. At the end of 2011, the assessment showed that there was a 64.7% decrease in fatal collisions and a 12.8% decrease in serious injury collisions compared to 2010. Compared to the 2006-2010 five year average, there was a 36.8% decrease in fatal collisions and a 7% decrease in serious injury collisions.

Metropolitan Police Service (UK) Operation Pearl: Addressing Inebriants and Beggars in a Town Center
Room: Bristol/Kent
10:45 - 12:00 : Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012
Sergeant Darren Hepple, Metropolitan Police Service, Kim Merry, Hope for Havering Charity, Facilitator: Assistant Chief (ret.) Ron Glensor, Reno Police Department

Police in the London Borough of Havering, through coordination with partner agencies identified “rough sleepers,” street drinkers and beggars were contributing to Anti Social Behavior within the Town Center. These individuals squabbled among themselves for the most lucrative begging locations and urinated and defecated in sight of the public. In response to the problem, the London Metropolitan Police launched Operation PEARL, a multi-agency partnership with British Transport Police, CCTV and Street Pastors. The initiative put pressure on rough sleepers to change their behavior or risk enforcement actions. The scheme assigned a dedicated liaison officer to each rough sleeper to act as a support worker guiding them towards recognized pathways of recovery. The scheme has brought together a number of organizations and has established a referral process for any new rough sleeper identified. It has brought about the introduction of a night shelter assessment hub, supported housing scheme and coordinated partnership working. The successes of this effort included the referral of 61 rough sleepers to various agencies and organizations for assistance.

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