Center for Problem-Oriented Policing

Model POP Curriculum

Supplemental Readings For Graduate Courses or Other Upper Level Settings

Module 1 – The Evolution of Policing

  1. Weisburd, D. & Eck, J. E. (2004, May). What Can Police Do to Reduce Crime, Disorder, and Fear?. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Vol. 593: 42-65.
  2. Sampson, R. J. & Raudenbush, Stephen, W. (2001, February). Disorder in Urban Neighborhoods: Does It Lead to Crime? PDF Washington D.C.: National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice. Accessed at http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/186049.pdf PDF.
  3. Scott, Michael, S. (2004). The Benefits and Consequences of Police Crackdowns. Center for Problem Oriented Policing. Accessed at http://www.popcenter.org/responses/crackdowns .

Module 2 – Community Policing

  1. Moore, Mark H. (1992). Problem-Solving and Community Policing. Crime and Justice. Vol. 15: 99-158.
  2. U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (2006). What is Community Policing? Accessed at http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/default.asp?Item=36.

Module 3 – Introduction to Problem Oriented Policing

  1. Scott, Michael, S. (2000, October). Problem-Oriented Policing: Reflections on the First 20 Years. Washington, D.C: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services. Accessed at http://www.popcenter.org/library/reading/pdfs/Reflections.pdf PDF.
  2. Goldstein, H. (1979, April). Improving Policing: A Problem Oriented Approach. Crime and Delinquency. Vol. 25: 236-258.
  3. POP Center (2006). What is Problem-Oriented Policing? Accessed at http://www.popcenter.org/about-whatisPOP.htm.
  4. POP Center (2006). The Key Elements of POP. Accessed at http://www.popcenter.org/about/?p=elements.

Module 4 – The SARA Model

  1. U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (2002). Problem Solving Tips: A Guide to Reducing Crime and Disorder through Problem-Solving Partnerships. Washington D.C. Accessed at /library/reading/pdfs/Tips.pdf PDF.
  2. Problem-Oriented Policing Center (2006). The SARA Model. Accessed at http://www.popcenter.org/about-SARA.htm.

Module 5 – Crime Theories and Crime Opportunity

  1. Felson, M. & Clarke, R. V. (1998). Opportunity Makes the Thief: Practical Theory for Crime Prevention. Home Office: Research Development Statistics. Accessed at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/prgpdfs/fprs98.pdf
  2. Felson, Marcus. (2004) Crime and Everyday Life. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press; Chapters 1-5.
  3. Kelling, George and Wilson, James Q. (1982) Broken Windows. The Atlantic Monthly. Vol. 249 (3): 29-38.

Module 6 – Situational Crime Prevention

  1. Clarke, Ronald V. (1997). Situational Crime Prevention: Successful Case Studies. Albany, NY: Harrow and Heston. Accessed at http://www.popcenter.org/library/reading/pdfs/SCP2_front_matter.pdf PDF.
  2. Lasley, James (1998). Designing Out Gang Homicides and Street Assaults. Washington D.C.: National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice. Accessed at http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/173398.pdf PDF.

Module 7 – Identifying and Researching Problems

  1. Eck, John E. & Clarke, Ronald V. (2003). Classifying Common Police Problems: A Routine Activity Approach. Crime Prevention Studies; Vol. 16: 7-39.

Module 8 – Problem Solving Resources

  1. Online readings/resources only.

Module 9 - Crime Analysis for Problem Solvers in 60 Small Steps

  1. Clark, Ronald, V. & Eck, John E. (no date). Crime Analysis for Problem Solvers in 60 Small Steps. Washington D.C.: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice. Accessed at http://www.popcenter.org/library/reading/pdfs/60Steps.pdf PDF.
  2. Boba, Rachel (2003). Problem Analysis in Policing. Washington D.C.: Police Foundation. Accessed at /library/reading/pdfs/problemanalysisinpolicing.pdf PDF.
  3. Bynum. Timothy S. (No date). Using Analysis for Problem Solving: A Guidebook for Law Enforcement. Washington D.C.: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice. Accessed at http://www.popcenter.org/library/reading/pdfs/Analysis.pdf PDF.
  4. O’Shea, Timothy, C. & Nichols, Keith (2003). Crime Analysis in America: Findings and Recommendations. Washington D.C.: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice.
  5. Mamalian, Cynthia, A. & LaVigne, Nancy, G. (1999). The Use of Computerized Crime Mapping by Law Enforcement: Survey Results. Washington D.C.: National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice. Accessed at http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/fs000237.pdf PDF.

Module 10 – Responding to Crime Places

  1. Smith, Mary, S. (1996). Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design in Parking Facilities. Washington D.C.: National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice. Accessed at http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/cptedpkg.pdf PDF.
  2. Ratcliffe, Jerry (2006). Video Surveillance of Public Places. Washington D.C.: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice. Accessed at http://www.popcenter.org/Responses/PDFs/VideoSurveillance.pdf PDF.

Module 11 – Responding to Offenders

  1. Martin, Susan E. & Sherman, Lawrence W. (1986). Selective Apprehension: A Police Strategy for Repeat Offenders. Criminology, Vol. 24: 155-173.
  2. Martin, Susan E. (1986). Policing Career Criminals: An Examination of an Innovative Crime Control Program. Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 77: 1159-1182.
  3. Abrahamse, Allan, Ebener, Patricia A., Greenwood, Peter W., Fitzgerald, Nora & Kosin, Thomas E. (1991). An Experimental Evaluation of the Phoenix Repeat Offender Program. Justice Quarterly, Vol. 8 (2): 141-168. Available at http://www.rand.org/pubs/reprints/RP419/.

Module 12 – Responding to Targets/Victims

  1. Pease, Ken & Laycock, Gloria (1996). Revictimizations: Reducing the Heat on Hot Victims. Washington D.C.: National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice. Accessed at http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/revictim.pdf PDF.
  2. Anderson, David, Chenery, Sylvia & Pease, Ken (1995). Biting Back: Tackling Repeat Burglary and Car Crime. Crime Detection and Prevention Series Paper 58: United Kingdom: Home Office Police Research Group. Accessed at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/prgpdfs/cdp58bf.pdf
  3. Pease, Ken (2000). Repeat Victimization: Taking Stock. Crime Detection and Prevention Series Paper 90: United Kingdom: Home Office Police Research Group. Accessed at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/prgpdfs/cdp90bf.pdf PDF.
  4. Farrell, Graham, Edmunds, Alan, Hobbs, Louise & Laycock, Gloria (2000). RV Snapshot: UK Policing and Repeat Victimisation. Crime Reduction Research Series Paper 5: United Kingdom: Home Office Police Research Group. Accessed at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/prgpdfs/rvsnap5.pdf PDF.

Module 13 – Assessing and Evaluating Responses

  1. Eck, John, E. (2002). Assessing Responses to Problems: An Introductory Guide for Police Problem Solvers. Washington D.C.: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice. Accessed at http://www.popcenter.org/library/reading/pdfs/assessing_responses.pdf PDF.
  2. Police Executive Research Forum (1993). A Police Guide for Surveying Citizens and Their Environments (NCJ 143771). Washington D.C.: Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice. Accessed at http://www.popcenter.org/library/reading/pdfs/Surveying_Citizens.pdf PDF.

Module 14 – Challenges and Future Considerations for Implementing Successful POP Projects

  1. Knutsson, Johannes (2003). Mainstreaming Problem Oriented Policing. Monsey, NY: Criminal Justice Press.
  2. Barthe, Emmanuel (2006). Crime Prevention Publicity Campaigns. Problem-Oriented Guides for Police Response, Response Guide Series, #5. Washington D.C.: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice. Accessed at http://www.popcenter.org/Responses/PDFs/publicity_campaigns.pdf PDF.